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Growing up: The expansion of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

December 12, 2012 at 10:37 am
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By Lia Steakley, Writer for Stanford School of Medicine's Communications & Public Affairs Department This article was adapted from material provided by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Click here to be taken to the original article.

Back in September, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital broke ground on its 512,000-square-foot expansion, which will add 150 patient rooms, more treatment areas and the newest in medical technology. The current issue of Stanford Medicine Newsletter includes a story that lays out the plans for the new addition, which is scheduled to open in December 2016.


Introducing Usernames

December 3, 2012 at 4:26 pm
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By Julie Ruel, Social Media Manager, Stanford Blood Center

When accessing your online donor account, you now have the option of using a username of your choice, rather than your donor ID number. Creating your username is simple and straightforward – here's how it works:


New Center Opening in Menlo Park

November 29, 2012 at 11:59 am
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By Julie Ruel, Social Media Manager, Stanford Blood Center

Menlo Park, the home of such companies as Facebook, SRI International, and Sunset Magazine, is welcoming Stanford Blood Center to their community. On December 10th, the new center, located at 445 Burgess Drive, will be fully operational.


Feeling Better, But Isolated

November 20, 2012 at 2:01 pm
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By Dave Emberson, blood recipient

Okay, I will admit to having a bit of a meltdown on a recent Thursday evening when I got the news about having to go the transplant route, but my loving wife got me through it by forcing me to take lots of drugs and go to bed. God bless her.


Next Cafe Scientifique: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit

November 13, 2012 at 10:06 am
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Beth Kanter is the author of Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media for Social Change, Visiting Scholar at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation 2009-2013, and internationally recognized speaker and trainer. She is co-author of the highly acclaimed book, The Networked Nonprofit, published by Wiley in 2010, with Allison Fine and the recently published, "Measuring the Networked Nonprofit," with co-author KD Paine. Beth will be speaking at our next Cafe Scientifique on Thursday, November 15th.

I'm thrilled to announce the publication of my second book, "Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using Data to Change the World," with co-author and measurement goddess KD Paine. The book is about how nonprofits can measure and improve results from leveraging their networks. The frameworks and tips we outlined were field tested in real-time as part of my work as Visiting Scholar at the Packard Foundation with 60 of their grantees who participated in a peer learning/focus group and contributed many of the case studies.


Ask Stanford Med: Answers to your questions about seasonal influenza

November 8, 2012 at 9:54 am
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By Lia Steakley, Writer for Stanford School of Medicine's Communications & Public Affairs Department This article was adapted from material provided by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Click here to be taken to the original article.

The image above may look like a piece of abstract art, but it actually depicts influenza A. One of the three flu virus types responsible for the fatigue, fever and other symptoms that plague many of us from October to May, influenza A can infect people, birds and other animals.


While the 2011 influenza season was especially mild, that may not be the case this year. To help you and your family prepare for the flu season, we asked Corry Dekker, MD, medical director of the Stanford-Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Vaccine Program, to respond to your questions about the flu and vaccine research.


Don’t forget to cast your ballottas today

November 6, 2012 at 10:47 am
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By Billie Rubin, Hemoglobin's Catabolic Cousin, reporting from the labs of Stanford Blood Center

Ballot comes from the Italian word, ballotta or little colored ball. Several hundred years ago, ballottas were used to cast votes (if their candidates did not win, did they throw the balls at each other?). Each voter would drop either a white ball (in favor of the candidate) or a black ball (opposing the candidate) into the ballot box. Paper ballots were first used in North America in 1629 and later became widespread.


Vampire Bats

October 31, 2012 at 9:40 am
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By Billie Rubin, Hemoglobin's Catabolic Cousin, reporting from the labs of Stanford Blood Center

Vampire bats feed on the blood of other creatures, a hematophagy diet. There are three bat species whose only source of nutrition is blood: the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata), and the white-winged vampire bat.


Pop Goes the Blood Culture

October 24, 2012 at 9:34 am
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By Jennifer Boyer, Staff Writer, American Association of Blood Banks

Blood products and pop culture are an unlikely combination. Yet blood products have found their way into pop culture consciousness in recent years — from celebrities publicly supporting blood-related causes to the vampire and zombie crazes. They are even impacting lifestyle choices such as diet, exercise and dating.


RBCs: Taxi Cabs of the Cardio World

October 16, 2012 at 2:17 pm
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By Billie Rubin, Hemoglobin's Catabolic Cousin, reporting from the labs of Stanford Blood Center

Red blood cells are the taxi cabs of the cardio world. They can squeeze themselves into tiny capillaries or ride the big arterial highways like the aorta to different parts of the body. They are propelled by the currents created from the beats of the heart. They pick up oxygen molecule customers in the lungs and give it a ride to all the tissues of the body. The oxygen attaches itself to the iron at the center of the hemoglobin molecules (the taxi's red-velvet interior inside the RBC) and gets off where it's needed anywhere in the body.